Semana Santa in Spain

Semana Santa in Spain . . . was basically this for a whole week. Processions.


Drums and marching bands until late into the night, while hooded groups from church contemplated their sins in silence. I mostly just watched and drank wine.


To give you a rest from my babbling I will let the pictures do the talking for once.



Málaga


The large coastal city has some nice old parts and plenty of smart new additions too.


Lots of older English ordering calamari and buying ceramics before heading to the Picasso museum.


I stayed right next to the central market, handy for a quick bite.


Here's a view of the port from on top of the hill.


And finally, not a fan of 'builder's' but this is my cup of tea. Already looking forward to a trip across the water to Morocco!




Ronda


The small town of Ronda lies inland perched atop the an impressive cliff face.


Here is the famous bridge that joins the two sides of the town across a gorge.


Great walking in the hills below the town.


I stayed here, in a great location below the bridge. It turned out to be one of my favourite hostels, great value, really relaxing and served a mean Spanish omelet.



Gibraltar



Gibraltar, the home of proper pubs, the navy and even a Morrison's! What with the Spanish frantically buying fags and gin, the locals talking about the Premier League and the monkeys, it struck me as a great setting for a Soap Opera. Move over El Dorado!
The view from the top . . . again. Walking up the rock was possible although not recommended at the tourism office. 


After hours monkeying around up there I devoured the curry I ordered in about two minutes.


Gibraltar really is 'little England', with red phone boxes, the same pedestrian crossings and bank notes with the Queen's lovely face on. These threatening no parking signs amused me for some reason.












After an exhausting day wandering around, getting lost and finally finding a place to buy Marmite and curry paste, I headed to Algeciras, the Spanish port across the water.





Cádiz


Europe's oldest city is a corker. Narrow cobbled streets, tidy city beaches and some great harbour views.


I got the boat across the water (not the one pictured), as the city is on a spit. It was a nice walkable size and was busy with Semana Santa processions, although not a crazy as Sevilla or Málaga.




Being in a city with this many forts reminded me of being in Portabelo in Panama waiting for my maritime voyage across the Caribbean. I got a great 'racoon' tan after hours pounding the pavements wearing sunglasses and no hat.


It was a great trip around the South of Spain, now it's back to Baena for a few months before some more travels.